Dancing Letters at Typorama Exhibition from Phillippe Apeloig

“We should consider every day lost on which we have not danced at least once,” Friedrich Nietzsche

The first time we saw the layout for this exhibition, we’re just like trapped into a maze. The letters of the title of the exhibition, TYPORAMA, cut into pieces and scattered like a stick dance—one of Philippe Apeloig’s inspirations for his creation. However, one could say that he is not just a graphic designer, but also an artist. His interest for typography was developed in the 1980s when he interned with Total Design Studio in Amsterdam and he became a true typography artist.

Born in Paris in 1962, Philippe Apeloig is known for his avant-garde approach to graphic design and experimental uses of typography in his designs. He works predominantly for major cultural institutions like Musée d’Orsay, the Louvre, Théâtre du Châtelet and well known publishing houses, like Éditions de La Martinière and Phaidon Press. Hermès, Yves Saint Laurent and Puiforcat are also on the list of his client-book.

For this exhibition, Apeloig has selected more than 150 posters, logos, typographies, books and visual identities and published a book titled in the same name special for the exhibition. From the entrance, we can see the journey and elements that inspired the artist. Dance, war, color, culture and history are some of them. We can also notice the modernist movement influence in his graphics, most of them playing with the idea of past, present and future. It took a long process to create every single design. In the exhibition one can also understand the process from his research until the final result of each art piece. If we look into his creations, we could tell that every detail sends a message, either a historical or a social message. Yet, all of them are united into a beautiful “letter dance.” We love all of them, but we chose 3 works that amazed us most. Visit Musée Des Arts Décoratifs to enjoy his splendid creations and we guarantee you that you will agree with us.

  1.      Petit Palais, Yves Saint Laurent Poster

In 2010, Apeloig designed the Yves Saint Laurent restropective at the Petit Palais. He made a collage from the famous Cassandre YSL logo with the Mondrian color palette and the photograph of Yves Saint Laurent in 1962. One could see the emblematic elements of Yves Saint Laurent as a brand and a personality. If you love fashion and are a fan of Yves, you’ll identify these ideas easily.

Poster Yves Saint Laurent for the retrospective  held at Petit Palais Musée des Beaux-Arts de la Ville  de Paris, 2008  Design: Philippe Apeloig
Poster Yves Saint Laurent for the retrospective
held at Petit Palais Musée des Beaux-Arts de la Ville
de Paris, 2008
Design: Philippe Apeloig

 

  1.      Grand Palais, Le Saut Hermès Poster

Just a year ago, Hermès asked Philippe Apeloig to design the visual identity of Le Saut Hermès, a jumping competition at the Grand Palais. Here, he created a dance consisting of white letters on top of a jumping horse with an orange Hermès background. Simple, but it relates a lot of stories.

Poster for Le Saut Hermès au Grand Palais  Design, Jumping International CSI 5, Paris, 2013 Design: Philippe Apeloig
Poster for Le Saut Hermès au Grand Palais
Design, Jumping International CSI 5, Paris, 2013
Design: Philippe Apeloig

 

  1.      Musée d’Orsay, Chicago Poster

Philippe Apeloig presented in Musée d’Orsay his first exhibition in 1987 entitled “Chicago, naissance d’une métropole 1872-1922.” In this poster, he combined the new technologies with manual touch. And for the purpose of the current exhibition, he shared with the visitors the history of its conception. First, he took an old photograph of the city, cut by hand the letters “Chicago” and used the new technology at that moment called Total Design to place that word with an effect like a gust of wind. As a result, we could see an impressive three-dimensional effect and a perspective play in this magnificent poster. It was one of his first emblematic posters.

Poster for the exhibition Chicago, naissance  d’une métropole, 1877-1922 at Musée d’Orsay,  Paris,1987  Design: Philippe Apeloig
Poster for the exhibition Chicago, naissance
d’une métropole, 1877-1922 at Musée d’Orsay,
Paris,1987
Design: Philippe Apeloig

Practical info:

21 November 2013 – 30 March 2014

Decorative Arts – Advertising 
107 rue de Rivoli, 75001 Paris
 

Tel. : 01 44 55 57 50 
Metro: Palais Royal or Tuileries Pyramides 
Bus: 21, 27, 39, 48, 68, 69, 72, 81, 95

By Christine Evans & Nadia Abdel-Malek

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