The good decision for Miss World: No More Swimsuits

The organizers of the annual Miss World pageant have decided to eliminate the swimsuit section of the competition. The reason is that there is no purpose of this segment of the show and it is not the path they are trying to take.
Chris Wilmer, the national director of Miss World America/Miss United States organization, explains “Miss World should be a spokesperson who can help a community. She’s more of an ambassador, not a beauty queen. It’s more about the outreach and what a woman could do with a title like Miss World.”
Miss South Africa Wins Miss World

Miss South Africa Wins Miss World

Miss World is the oldest international beauty pageant, originally called the Festival Bikini Contest. It was established in England in 1951 by Eric Morley, who wanted to lift spirits after the end of Second World War. After the contest drew complaints, the bikini was replaced with a more modest swimsuit and the segment of the show has existed ever since.
Miss World's 1989

Miss World’s 1989

Wilmer stresses that the pageant shouldn’t just be based on appearance. He says,
“it’s not just a beauty contest, it’s beauty with a purpose. There didn’t seem to be a purpose to have the swimsuit.”

In my opinion they have made the right decision to eliminate the swimsuit section. In the times when eating disorders become a major worry among teenagers, we don’t need to see women walking up and down in bikinis. It doesn’t bring any benefit to the contestants nor the viewers. We don’t care if the woman has legs two inches taller than someone else. When watching Miss World we are really listening to her speak and how she will represent the world.

Wilmer and his colleagues make this decision knowing that the traditional beauty pageant and the exposure of the female forms are topics being overly discussed. Today, a woman is not only beautiful if she is a size 0. You can be beautiful in your own way just like the full size models who have a really strong self-confidence. We should be able to learn from them.
By: Nadine Fakih